The Biochemist Blog

Getting in2science

By Joy Aston, in2scienceUK

In2Science helps young people from low income backgrounds progress to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) careers with the aim to not only improve social mobility, but also encourage a more diverse and inclusive culture within the sector. We work by leveraging the STEM community to host bespoke two-week work placements, matching students with active researchers in academia and industry. In2scienceUK coordinators also provide all the students with university access workshops and careers guidance.

The life of a Scientist…lessons learnt from The Big Bang Theory

By Priya Hari, University of Edinburgh

It’s season 11 of The Big Bang Theory – the well-loved comedy showcasing a group of stereotypical nerds (or as I like to think, scientists who are normal people like me and you). The show, based on the social lives physicists, engineers and biologists, is usually a comedic affair, but episode 2 of season 11 went a little beyond that. It highlighted a number of matters that certainly can be related to by a scientist of any discipline.

Why bacteria are smarter than we think they are

By Megan De Ste Croix, University of Leicester

Just like humans bacteria can catch a virus, however, when you’re just a single cell catching a virus can be pretty fatal. Because of this, bacteria have developed some effective systems to protect themselves. These systems, known as restriction-modification (RM) systems, come in a variety of shapes and sizes but it has always been thought their primary function is a defensive one against invading viruses and other invading DNA.

Youyou Tu and the discovery of artemisinin

By Isabel Vincent, University of Glasgow

Female scientists often struggle disproportionately compared to their male counterparts, but every now and then a woman will manage to break through the misogyny and show the world the potential that is often missed. Youyou Tu received the Nobel prize for medicine/physiology in 2015 for the discovery of the anti-malarial drug artemisinin – a remarkable achievement for a woman with no medical degree, no doctorate and no overseas experience.