Systems Biology: Leveraging Biological Complexity and Computational Power

When studying how a bicycle works, we can break it down into its composite parts (e.g. the gears, brakes and wheels) and study each part in isolation. But although we would become experts on the parts, the gears, brakes, or wheels, we would still need to integrate knowledge across these parts to understand how the whole bicycle system works, or how a change in one part of this system would affect other parts. This rationale can be applied similarly to the study of disease mechanisms. Continue reading Systems Biology: Leveraging Biological Complexity and Computational Power

SARS-CoV 2: eXplaining the differences in death rates

As the SARS-CoV-2, or more commonly known as Covid-19, pandemic continues to spread, epidemiologists seem to be churning out some mindboggling numbers. Recently, I came across a puzzling statistic which concluded that women were less likely to die from contracting Covid-19 than men were. Additionally, this was in the above 65 years category, where there is a higher percentage of women than men. Delving into the literature, looking for an explanation to make sense of the difference in death rate, I found an extremely neat explanation relating to X chromosome inactivation. Continue reading SARS-CoV 2: eXplaining the differences in death rates