The Biochemist Blog

How to be better at networking at conferences

Claudia Bonfio, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK

For a young undergraduate student, attending a conference could mean visiting a new country, having fun (and drinks) with other group members and grabbing as many gadgets as possible from sponsors’ stands. For an academically-grown up postdoc, together with attending great scientific talks, attending conferences means networking with people in the same field or outside of it, to create new collaborations and partnerships.

Hints & tips for preparing your first poster presentation

By Valentina Gifford, University of Oxford

In March, I attended the The Dynamic Cell III meeting in Manchester, where, with great excitement, I presented my first poster. The meeting started with the Students/Postdocs symposium, where we got the chance to warm up and have a quick taste of the amazing research that was about to follow. Then, a perfect mix of more experienced and early-career scientists set the context for an inspiring scientific discussion, that brought together a wide variety of topics, all focusing on understanding cell functions, such as motility and cell-cell interactions. The quality of the presentations was outstanding and everybody was able to share his enthusiasm.

The best laid plans…10 top tips for planning a conference as a PhD student!

By Meg Booth, University of Cambridge

At the start of my PhD I decided to seek out some careers advice. I was told that many PhD students spend 100% of their time in the lab and neglect their all-important CVs. For jobs both in and out of academia, having a couple of stand out points on your CV is as important as the PhD itself. During my undergraduate degree I worked part time doing event promotions for a national radio station and the University of Liverpool. Therefore, the logical decision was to organise an event for other PhD students!