Exercise protects against cancer – but how?

A study found that blood (serum) collected after a single bout of exercise (‘acute exercise’) was able to reduce cancer cell growth. Interestingly, serum collected at rest but after 6-months of exercise training had no effect. This suggests that the biochemical changes involved in the acute response to exercise can have direct anti-cancer effects. Continue reading Exercise protects against cancer – but how?

The big C: cancer vs cardiovascular disease – the importance of translational medicine

by Beth Webb Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease Cancer and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are the two-leading causes of death worldwide. However, survival rates for both diseases are higher than ever suggesting that people are more likely to suffer from both cancer and CVD in their lifetime. CVD includes all heart and circulatory diseases such as; coronary heart disease, angina, heart attack, congenital heart disease, hypertension, stroke, … Continue reading The big C: cancer vs cardiovascular disease – the importance of translational medicine

Investigating Somatic Mutations in Cancer Development

All sporadic cancer is caused by acquired somatic mutations (mutations that take place within cells of the body that are not passed down/inherited). Mutations often occur by incorrect repair of DNA damage by impaired DNA pathways such as the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway and the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathway. Continue reading Investigating Somatic Mutations in Cancer Development